Angela Bocage


New crack for the lawyers…much more enjoyable than synthetic blood…

Twilight having reached pinnacles of synergistic ubiquity heretofore unknown, it’s fortunate for me that, in a frenzy not dissimilar to that which possessed me during the first few days after Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows dropped, I’d long ago read all the books plus Meyer’s grownup book The Host before any randomly heard conversations between dumbass fellow SEPTA-passengers could spoil any surprises. So now, the wonderfully clever and amusing young (mostly young) attorneys with whom I share space have moved on to discussing True Blood and devouring Charlaine Harris’ series of southern vampire novels on which the HBO series is based. It’s my personal version of watching football, I guess, in the sense of being utterly useless and silly and bewitchingly fun vicarious involvement in events so far from our own real lives. In the same way as the football fans discuss the games—what coaches might do, relative skills of players—we discussed throughout the first season whether Sam could have killed vampire-friendly female Bon Temps citizens to frighten Sookie away from Bill, whether the Sheriff’s Department could have been covering up for one of their own, what Amy was REALLY after. But the brilliant twist of the whole series, books and HBO, is that in making the vampires the latest civil rights-vs.-bigotry flashpoint, they force the viewer to exist in a world where race and sexuality aren’t all that important. This can be very disturbing, e.g. when Sookie’s friend and coworker Lafayette, both gay and African American, confronts a high-profile politician with whom he’s had various extra-legal business dealings—because he’s outraged by the would-be senator’s anti-vampire stance, not his homophobia—and then proceeds to use the politician’s constituents’ racism to harm his electability by posing for a friendly photo. The choice of music and the swampy southern atmosphere of the show are also rather enchanting. Next season it’ll probably suck, so I’m glad to have at least been turned on the the books.


One is highly recommended for endorphinizing ROTFLing…one just because

Down in the dumps, apathetic, downright glum? Pleeeease go to the land of mondegreens, kissthisguy.com: I swear it makes me crumple helplessly laughing so hard it’s almost like a seizure, or a sea lion yelping in pain. Today in Whole-Paycheck-For-Foods, this adorably koala-bear-like li’l fella behind the fish counter was regaling my colleague and me with his no doubt highly-qualified theories on humor; the pun, he asserted, was the lowest form. He had a reason to be so assertive: he himself championed another reviled form of humor, the Fart Joke. Which, he told us, has a rich classical literary history, not only specifically citing Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales, but directing us right to the fart of the matter, The Miller’s Tale and The Miller’s Wife’s Tale therein. Well, two people I love very much also champion the fart joke–one was known to have been the miscreant who placed the whoopie cushion under the PASTOR’s chair at a respected academic institution, first carefully adding a teaspoon of water for enhanced audio! But for me, humor’s pinnacle, at least in terms of making my ribs hurt, will always be the mondegreen, of which a Jimi Hendrix line misheard as “Excuse Me While I Kiss This Guy” is the iconic example. So if you’re at all interested in popular music, do check out the kissthisguy.com site; if you looked at it awhile ago, it’s also gotten a lot easier to get around.

Second, and there’s some ground I still have to cover to completely make sense of this one, the Stephenie (yes that’s how she spells it) Meyer series Twilight, New Moon, Eclipse, and Breaking Dawn, has taken over the reading hearts and minds of dozens of extremely bright, articulate, mature professional young women at my workplace. It is most commonly compared to crack. It is wonderful. I felt like a latish adopter on this one, but after all I am in Philadelphia, so cut me some slack, and if you have any idea why this series is soooo addictive, delightful, fun, compulsive, etc., please to comment. I’ll give you some of my theories tomorrow, tonight I have to go to bed early for work.



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